I could use a success story to keep me going

What’s one thing you did recently that pain’s been holding ya back from doing for a while? Could use a success story to keep me going :slight_smile:

I hear you, man.
I just heard a really inspiring story from one of the Lin coaches during a recent webinar.
Check it out - it really pumped me up
Shannon’s recovery story

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one word - WOW! that’s so crazy she kicked fibro

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My knee pain was holding me back from running. But then I realized that it was due to my family stress rather than a meniscus tear. I started to notice it was only there on certain runs where I was processing stressful stuff and putting pressure on myself. On runs where I was in a good headspace, my knees felt fine. This evidence helped me see through the pain and start to see it as non-dangerous. Now that I attend to my knee pain in a new way and use it to tune into my feelings, it eases within a few minutes.

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A couple of weeks ago I went to a concert - first one in over a decade I could enjoy pain free, and it took me a moment to actually relax into the experience. When we got to the venue, I saw the chairs and stools available to have a bite to eat before the concert, and the first thought that popped into my head was “oh, no, those look terribly uncomfortable”. And then I remembered I no longer have back pain, my back is healthy and strong and I can sit anywhere. Same thing for sitting down, standing up and dancing throughout the concert. I had a blast!

I hadn’t been to a concert in a long time, as even before the pandemic I’d just stopped because I was in so much pain every time, and my partner would go with other friends while I stayed home. Now I can’t wait for the next one :smiley:

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One of the best parts of recovering is doing things I never thought I’d be able to do again. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 1997 and have been recovered for a little over two years. Since then, I’ve learned how to snowshoe and kayak. I’ve started hiking and riding my bike again. Last winter, I downhill skied for the first time in 30+ years. It was so fun to discover that my body didn’t forget how! I am currently on a road trip with my husband and spending 6 or more hours a day in the car. Three years ago, I couldn’t sit in a chair, let alone ride in a car.

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I have struggled with tension headaches for over 15 years. I saw PTs who focused on the muscles, but the tension always came back. I started learning to look for evidence such as inconsistencies in my pain (there when I did overhead press one day, but not the next), the fact that my pain always seemed worse after a stressful day of work, and that the PT brought short term relief but never long term. I also had my friend (who is a physical therapist) test my upper body strength to confirm I had adequate strength, and helped me rule out any major structural dysfunction. This all helped me feel more and more confident that structurally my neck and shoulders were healthy and strong. Now I am working out at Orange Theory Fitness 4x/ week… never resulting in a tension headache or pain. I used to limit my strength training for fear I would get more tension.

That is amazing. When, though would you say it’s a good time to listen to the knees? I’ve noticed walks/runs where I’m in a good headspace, but my knees still hurt. Any thoughts?

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Sometimes pain is a helpful message from the brain that there’s something emotional to attend to. Other times pain is a helpful message from the brain that there’s something physical going on. And other times pain is just random and simply the brain’s reflexive habit that it does outside of our conscious awareness of either of those things. We like to support peoples understanding what pay means on a case by case basis. It’s very important to personalize the mechanism and the meaning.

My knees are always the things that I am afraid will stop me. I just went on a long hilly (for me) hike this last weekend and it was great! I kept telling myself that my legs are strong and that fear is the real symptom for me to attend to.

I spent time connecting to the nature around me and why I was on the hike. It was the best hike and recovery I’ve had in awhile. I even told myself that I’m safe feeling sore. And it felt good to be sore the next day and it shifted pretty quickly.

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Wow! I am impressed! How long have you been working at this?

Wow! I am impressed. Sitting is still a challenge for me, as is driving.

Thank you! My pain recovery journey through a mindbody approach started summer 2020.

Before injuring my back 22 years ago i was a very fit person training in martial arts, going bushwalking, canoeing etc. I injured my back at work and then 10 months later was in a car accident making things worse. i was laid up for a long while. then 18 years ago i found belly dancing which helped me recover and although i still lived with pain was managing it well. Then 6 or 7 years ago my back worsened apparently osteoarthritis has seized up my spine making it harder for me to dance over those past years. Last Novemeber i stopped teaching and performing dance and concentrated on rehabilitation to regain mobility. I went from struggling to get to the letterbox at the end of my driveway to being able to do laps up and down my street, then progressed to longer walks along the beach and recently was able to do a bushwalk for the first time in years :slight_smile: I am also back to belly dancing with my friends again which is lovely. I still need to get back to hydrotherapy and work on mobility and strentgh but this is a big win as i head in the right direction x good luck to you all

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This is so inspiring, @AnnMarie_Hammond - What kind of things did you do to move forward so dramatically? Is there any one thing, in particular, that’s “made all the difference” for you?

And welcome, by the way!
I see you’ve just joined us. Happy to have you here!
I’m Sarah; pretty new here too :wink:

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I’ve found that sitting is a challenge for a lot of people! I used to think I was the only person who struggled with it.

@mimik I totally get the sitting thing. My sit bones start to feel it after a bit. And I find my shoulders and neck get sore too sometimes when sitting at my computer for a while. Getting up and walking around/movement has helped. But more than that, I realized that I often feel those pains when working at my computer, where I feel stressed. The harder I am on myself, the more I feel those symptoms. Something I’ve found helpful is taking a break to check in, take a deep breath, and then refocus.

I would love to know what all you did to be able to become functional again. It’s my number one aspiration right now.